BitLit announces HarperCollins ebook bundling pilot programme | FutureBook

In a potentially major gain for the ebook-bundling concept, BitLit today is announcing its first deal with a Big Five publisher. HarperCollins US has entered what is being described as a pilot programme with the Vancouver-based BitLit to offer discounted ebook editions of print books that readers already own.

 

By way of demonstrating this bookshop-friendly stance, BitLit has teamed up with 13 prominent Canadian bookstores between Vancouver and Toronto in a Summer Reads programme that offers a selection of ebooks free to readers who buy the print editions. The applicable books are marked in participating bookstores with stickers that offer a “BitLit.com Free eBook with purchase of print book.”

 

In a prepared statement, HarperCollins’ chief digital officer, Chantal Restivo-Alessi, lays out the logic of the arrangement for the publisher in this pilot programme: “BitLit offers readers another way to engage with the books they’ve purchased so they can read in various formats as they choose. It provides added value to consumers at a discounted price, and additional sales for our authors.”

 

And when asked if we’ll see the day when the buyer of an ebook can then apply to BitLit for a discounted print edition of that book? Hudson: “Stay tuned.”

 

via BitLit announces HarperCollins ebook bundling pilot programme | FutureBook

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Is Selling Direct Worth It?

“I’m sure HarperCollins is well-intentioned,” said Jack McKeown, a former executive at both HarperCollins and Perseus Books and now president of Books and Books, a bookstore in Westhampton, N.Y. “Publishers do need to engage consumers and offer buy buttons for their convenience. But an aggressive pursuit of direct sales, I think, is misguided and a misallocation of resources.” While publishers with deep expertise in specific genres, such as Tor or Harlequin, can do well selling direct, McKeown said an overemphasis on direct selling is a mistake for large general interest publishers. “Consumers are not looking for publishers, they’re looking to retailers to aggregate and recommend titles. Harper is disaggregating our audience. They can’t offer an array of topics and publications. While I do understand what they are trying to do, they should be working to amplify their existing retail channels.”

via Is Selling Direct Worth It?